Layout

Note

Still under construction...

Immediate Mode Layouts

reset([x, y[, pad_x[, pad_y]]])
Arguments:
  • x,y (numbers) – Origin of the layout (optional).
  • pad_x,pad_y – Cell padding (optional).

Reset the layout, puts the origin at (x,y) and sets the cell padding to pad_x and pad_y.

If x and y are omitted, they default to (0,0). If pad_x is omitted, it defaults to 0. If pad_y is omitted, it defaults to pad_x.

padding([pad_x[, pad_y]])
Arguments:
  • pad_x – Cell padding in x direction (optional).
  • pad_y – Cell padding in y direction (optional, defaults to pad_x).
Returns:

The current (or new) cell padding.

Get and set the current cell padding.

If given, sets the cell padding to pad_x and pad_y. If only pad_x is given, set both padding in x and y direction to pad_x.

size()
Returns:width,height - The size of the last cell.

Get the size of the last cell.

nextRow()
Returns:x,y - Upper left corner of the next row cell.

Get the position of the upper left corner of the next cell in a row layout. Use for mixing precomputed and immediate mode layouts.

nextCol()
Returns:x,y - Upper left corner of the next column cell.

Get the position of the upper left corner of the next cell in a column layout. Use for mixing precomputed and immediate mode layouts.

push([x, y])
Arguments:
  • x,y (numbers) – Origin of the layout (optional).

Saves the layout state (position, padding, sizes, etc.) on a stack, resets the layout with position (x,y).

If x and y are omitted, they default to (0,0).

Used for nested row/column layouts.

pop()

Restores the layout parameters from the stack and advances the layout position according to the size of the popped layout.

Used for nested row/column layouts.

row(w, h)
Arguments:
  • w,h (mixed) – Cell width and height (optional).
Returns:

Position and size of the cell: x,y,w,h.

Creates a new cell below the current cell with width w and height h. If either w or h is omitted, the value is set the last used value. Both w and h can be a string, which takes the following meaning:

max
Maximum of all values since the last reset.
min
Mimimum of all values since the last reset.
median
Median of all values since the last reset.

Used to provide the last four arguments to a widget, e.g.:

suit.Button("Start Game", suit.layout:row(100,30))
suit.Button("Options", suit.layout:row())
suit.Button("Quit", suit.layout:row(nil, "median"))
down(w, h)

An alias for layout:row().

col(w, h)
Arguments:
  • w,h (mixed) – Cell width and height (optional).
Returns:

Position and size of the cell: x,y,w,h.

Creates a new cell to the right of the current cell with width w and height h. If either w or h is omitted, the value is set the last used value. Both w and h can be a string, which takes the following meaning:

max
Maximum of all values since the last reset.
min
Mimimum of all values since the last reset.
median
Median of all values since the last reset.

Used to provide the last four arguments to a widget, e.g.:

suit.Button("OK", suit.layout:col(100,30))
suit.Button("Cancel", suit.layout:col("max"))

An alias for layout:col().

up(w, h)
Arguments:
  • w,h (mixed) – Cell width and height (optional).
Returns:

Position and size of the cell: x,y,w,h.

Creates a new cell above the current cell with width w and height h. If either w or h is omitted, the value is set the last used value. Both w and h can be a string, which takes the following meaning:

max
Maximum of all values since the last reset.
min
Mimimum of all values since the last reset.
median
Median of all values since the last reset.

Be careful when mixing up() and layout:row(), as suit does no checking to make sure cells don’t overlap. e.g.:

suit.Button("A", suit.layout:row(100,30))
suit.Button("B", suit.layout:row())
suit.Button("Also A", suit.layout:up())
left(w, h)
Arguments:
  • w,h (mixed) – Cell width and height (optional).
Returns:

Position and size of the cell: x,y,w,h.

Creates a new cell to the left of the current cell with width w and height h. If either w or h is omitted, the value is set the last used value. Both w and h can be a string, which takes the following meaning:

max
Maximum of all values since the last reset.
min
Mimimum of all values since the last reset.
median
Median of all values since the last reset.

Be careful when mixing left() and layout:col(), as suit does no checking to make sure cells don’t overlap. e.g.:

suit.Button("A", suit.layout:col(100,30))
suit.Button("B", suit.layout:col())
suit.Button("Also A", suit.layout:left())

Precomputed Layouts

Apart from immediate mode layouts, you can specify layouts in advance. The specification is a table of tables, where each inner table follows the convention of row() and col(). The result is a layout definition object that can be used to access the cells.

There are almost only two reasons to do so: (1) You know the area of your layout in advance (say, the screen size), and want certain cells to dynamically fill the available space; (2) You want to animate the cells.

Note

Unlike immediate mode layouts, precomputed layouts can not be nested. You can mix immediate mode and precomputed layouts to achieve nested layouts with precomputed cells, however.

Layout Specifications

Layout specifications are tables of tables, where the each inner table corresponds to a cell. The inner tables define the width and height of the cell according to the rules of row() and col(), with one additonal keyword:

fill
Fills the available space, determined by min_height or min_width and the number of cells with property fill.

For example, this row specification makes the height of the second cell to (300 - 50 - 50) / 1 = 200:

{min_height = 300,
    {100, 50},
    {nil, 'fill'},
    {nil, 50},
}

This column specification divides the space evenly among two cells:

{min_width = 300,
    {'fill', 100}
    {'fill'}
}

Apart from min_height and min_width, layout specifications can also define the position (upper left corner) of the layout using the pos keyword:

{min_width = 300, pos = {100,100},
    {'fill', 100}
    {'fill'}
}

You can also define a padding:

{min_width = 300, pos = {100,100}, padding = {5,5},
    {'fill', 100}
    {'fill'}
}

Layout Definition Objects

Once constructed, the cells can be accessed in two ways:

  • Using iterators:

    for i, x,y,w,h in definition() do
        suit.Button("Button "..i, x,y,w,h)
    end
    
  • Using the cell(i) accessor:

    suit.Button("Button 1", definition.cell(1))
    suit.Button("Button 3", definition.cell(3))
    suit.Button("Button 2", definition.cell(2))
    

There is actually a third way: Because layout definitions are just tables, you can access the cells directly:

local cell = definition[1]
suit.Button("Button 1", cell[1], cell[2], cell[3], cell[4])
-- or suit.Button("Button 1", unpack(cell))

This is especially useful if you want to animate the cells, for example with a tween:

for i,cell in ipairs(definition)
    local destination = {[2] = cell[2]} -- save cell y position
    cell[2] = -cell[4] -- move cell just outside of the screen

    -- let the cells fall into the screen one after another
    timer.after(i / 10, function()
        timer.tween(0.7, cell, destination, 'bounce')
    end)
end

Constructors

rows(spec)
Arguments:
  • spec (table) – Layout specification.
Returns:

Layout definition object.

Defines a row layout.

cols(spec)
Arguments:
  • spec (table) – Layout specification.
Returns:

Layout definition object.

Defines a column layout.